Docile broadcasting

    0
    51

    ‘When will this nation wake up that popularity does not translate into ability or competence?’

    NOT all media companies are bound by a common cause for objective truth and fearless independence. The chilling effects of the closure of ABS-CBN have been evident, especially in the broadcast industry. Most owners of TV and radio networks are not about to court the ire of President Duterte by going hammer and tongs against his uncouth and abusive language, rampant EJKs, drug smuggling, the mishandling of the pandemic and mounting infections, as well as massive corruption in government.

    People are not easily fed today with what they could no longer swallow due to manifest biases in political and popularity surveys. Sara Duterte and Bongbong Marcos are on top of recent surveys of Pulse Asia and a dubious group, Pinasurvey ng DigiVoice, which makes Pulse Asia’s output similarly dubious. Broadcast networks should partner and conduct genuine independent surveys which they owe to their countless viewers and listeners.

    Facing government threats certainly comes with the territory. The news media have customarily engaged in unofficial but reliable advance poll count during national and elections. but the present times call for them to be zealously advocacy-driven for indispensable social and political enlightenment. Election lawyer and senatorial bet Romy Macalintal warns against survey agencies contracting other groups for research and info and should be investigated.

    When will this nation wake up that popularity does not translate into ability or competence?

    A deep cultural change is required for millions of voters not to value popularity as a major factor in voting actors and other celebrities. No one can fully explain the irresistible urge among majority of our countrymen why this mindset persists. Lack of education has left a void only entertainment media could fill.

    ***

    From Sustainable Human on FB: “Sadio Mane, a Senagalese soccer star who plays for the British team in Liverpool, earns about 10.2 million dollars a year and gave the world a lesson in modesty after fans spotted him carrying a cracked iPhone. His response was legendary: ‘Why would I want 10 Ferraris, 20 diamond watches and 2 jet planes? What would that for to the world? I starved, I worked in the fields, I played barefoot, and I didn’t go to school. Now I can help people. I prefer to build schools and give poor people food or clothing. I have built schools and a stadium; we provide clothes, shoes, and food for people in extreme poverty. In addition, I give 70 euros per month to all people in a very poor Senegalese region in order to help their family’s economy. I do not need to display luxury cars, luxury homes, planes and trips. I prefer that my people receive a little of what life has given me.’”